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in nearly the past three years, and the whole fiasco added to the deficit. host: after the news conference yesterday, house speaker john boehner responded with this statement -- " what are your thoughts on this? if the debt ceiling negotiable. some quick comments -- remember, you can post your comments on twitter. the first phone call is from maryland, a democratic caller, jill. caller: i don't believe the debt ceiling is negotiable. it is kind of ridiculous that the money is already owed, so why are we not going to pay what is owed to other people? if people have made investments, the bills have to be paid. i find it ridiculous that people in congress don't want to pay what is already owed. it does not make sense. host: here is the wall street journal this morning. caller: well, if you're asking me if that's true, i think there definitely needs to be somewhat of a compromise as far as spending cuts, but that is not an easy issue, because spending cuts mean job losses. it's not an easy thing to say a president will say we will stop paying the bills too. so there has to be compromised rehab
house caprettto prioritize the government's bills. guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake a deficit-reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a dead beat nation, really. i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know firsthand, second-hand, but much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, some of them realize the potential consequences. host: if president obama won on the fiscal cliff d
, but $120 billion a year. our deficit is 1.2. all they're talking about 10% of the problem. the people don't understand. they think the 1.2 is equal to the deficit. it's only 10% of the deficit. my solution is to raise taxes by $300 billion and cut spending by $900. -- by $900 billion. i find the american public is not very smart. host: you know, that is -- the educational question is a fundamental question. here's what happens. let's talk in practical terms and not a theoretical terms. when paul ryan came out with his budget, he had some substantial changes in medicare and medicaid. over time they would've been phased in. no one over the age of 55 would've been affected by them, giving you time to really prepare for your retirement. the changes were relatively minor in the short run, but compounded over the next 20 years would've made a real difference in our indebtedness. that is not the kind of debate we had last year either at the presidential or senatorial congressional level. it was this. people want to change medicare want to push ganny. off a people who want to change medicaid are
, the nation we need to rebuild is our own. we have to grow our economy and shrink our deficits. we have to create new jobs and boost family incomes. we have to fix our infrastructure and our immigration system. we have to protect our planet from the destructive effects of climate change. we need to protect our children from the horrors of gun violence. host: the president in his weekly address, touching on some of the things that will come up in his state of the union address, scheduled for next february. this point and our twitter page -- from "the new york times sunday magazine, an interview with president shimon peres of israel. let me share with you when -- one wuote -- in the end, if nothing works, the president will use military power against iran. i am sure of it. that is an interview with shimon peres, the discussion of u.s.- israeli relations and the situation in iran. that is available online as well. let's go back to your calls on the issue of congress being bypassed to raise the debt limit. the hill newspaper, a letter written by senate democrats -- they sent a letter to the
marijuana will reduce the deficit, increase revenue, increase jobs. decrease crime in half. host: so what do you think about the strategy from house republicans? what do you think specifically on this as a strategy? caller: i think it's just a big joke. without new revenue. they know. they don't care that we're going down the tubes. they don't care about sese quest ration. now they are talking about the construction industry is going crazy. we need more cheap labor from third world countries. like that's going to help. host: ela is on our democrats line from charlotte, south carolina. you're on. what do you think about this proposal? caller: i think it's crazy. because the president is not going to go for it. he has already said that he wants a clean debt ceiling bill. not three months that we have to go through the same thing again. he wants it for a whole year. so i don't understand why the republicans are doing this. they know they are not going to get it. they are not going to get this, so this is wasting precious time. they should do the debt ceiling for a whole year. host: so ella, hol
they need to put inshunes on a gun like you do a car. host: so often we focus on the u.s. debt or deficit, we have exceeded now the dealt limit of $16.4 trillion. you can see in the upper left-hand side the debt clock. difficult choices on the debt if the u.s. think it's ceiling. the piece points out by mid february or early march the united states could face an unprecedented default unless it raises the debt ceiling. that was from tim geithner. further into the body of the "new york times" story i want to is share with you some of the numbers "the new york times" points out today. that could happen as early as february 15, if that happens by february 15 or early march, according to the by partisan policy center in analysis of what the government expects is $8 billion in revenue that day but it has $52 billion in spending that day, $6.8 billion in tax refunds, $3.5 in federal salaries, and $1.5 ode to military contractors and other commitments. consider again that day on february 15 f that is the day we reach the limit, the country would not have enough money to pay the bond holders let a
ground sell. especially with issues like debt and deficit dealing with what ever happens on gun control, they have a big heavy docket already. there are a lot of reasons this could still stumble. >> on the issue of guns and gun violence, the story on -- available on line with the headline in -- we asked him, what will pass? guest: i wish i knew. i would hope we could close the gun show loophole. which could limit the size of magazines. i would hope that we would have background checks the same for everybody and actually have some teeth and took them. host: what would the senate passed? what will house republican support with a twist on guns? guest: let's begin with the process that he will hold a hearing. he will hold a hearing and try to see what consensus can develop out of there. he is critical to this. the lot would come through his committee. the speech he game at georgetown on wednesday. i came away from their unsure of how far he is willing to go. he said he would be willing to take a look at an assault weapons ban, which he voted for in 1994. he said he told an interesting story
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7